“An Onshore Storm”

Dewey Lambdin

I really like the Alan Lewrie series. With one exception they’ve all been good reads, and some have been excellent. This one, though, is a real clinker. It doesn’t move Lewrie’s story much, and the writing is dull and repetitious. Our naval hero attacking a bridge is about the most exciting thing in the book, something that’s no more exciting the second time he does it.

“A King’s Trade”

Dewey Lambdin

The story of Alan Lewrie gets back on course in this sequel to “The Captain’s Vengeance”. His previous enlistment of Jamaican slaves has put him at risk of being tried for theft, a trial he avoids by accepting another assignment from the Foreign Office, one that brings him to the Cape of Good Hope and an encounter with a traveling British circus and theatrical troupe.

“The Captain’s Vengeance”

Dewey Lambdin

It’s 1799 and Alan Lewrie is in New Orleans hunting pirates. The pirates are improbably lead by a young Creole woman and we’re treated to (or subjected to, depending on one’s taste) the romantic entanglements that are part of every Lewrie story. This is probably the least well put-together story in the series so far. The setting is interesting but the plot is less than compelling.

This book follows “Havoc’s Sword” in the Alan Lewrie series.

“Sea of Grey”

Dewey Lambdin

Lambdin’s hero Alan Lewrie, his marriage in tatters, is sent to the Caribbean where he faces slave revolts, idiotic superiors, French privateers, and an American frigate.  This is typical Lambdin – a bit of “Flashman meets Hornblower” – but Lewrie does seem to be maturing.  This seems to be a transitional book in the series and I expect more action in the next one.